Difficult Bible Passages: Jesus and the Fig Tree

One of my regular correspondents, Richard, has asked for my thoughts on the “Jesus and the fig tree incident”. You know, the one where Jesus talks to a tree before cursing it. What on earth is that all about? Below is my attempt at making sense of it, but before that, here’s the passage in question: “On the following day, when they came from Bethany, he [Jesus] was hungry. And seeing in the distance a fig tree in leaf, he […]

Noah's Drunkenness by Jacques Joseph Tissot, 1836-1902

Difficult Bible Passages: What Did Noah’s Youngest Son do to Him?

“Noah’s Drunkenness” by Jacques Joseph Tissot, 1836-1902 “Noah began to be a man of the soil, and he planted a vineyard. He drank of the wine and became drunk and lay uncovered in his tent. And Ham, the father of Canaan, saw the nakedness of his father and told his two brothers outside. Then Shem and Japheth took a garment, laid it on both their shoulders, and walked backward and covered the nakedness of their father. Their faces were turned […]

Difficult Bible Passages: 1 Corinthians 11 – Hats and Hair

Some of my regular commenters seem to enjoy my attempts at Biblical expositions, so I thought it’d be good to start what will hopefully become a regular slot on TheBlogMire, where I give my thoughts on some of those verses and passages of the Bible that tend to make people go “huh?” First off is an amended piece that I wrote some years back for American Vision, which deals with a somewhat bizarre passage in 1 Corinthians 11:1-17, and which […]

The Unbiblical Teaching That Has Driven Donald Trump’s Jerusalem Decision

Donald Trump’s decision to recognise Jerusalem, rather than Tel Aviv, as the capital of Israel seems to me to be an act of monumental folly, guaranteed to provoke a huge backlash and wave of anger across the Middle East. It will be sure to add to the ranks of Islamist terrorists. It will alienate still further some of the US’s supposed allies (such as Turkey). And it will increase the influence of Iran throughout the Middle East. In other words, […]

Why CS Lewis Was Wrong When he Said Jesus’s Prophesy of His Second Coming Was “The Most Embarrassing Verse in the Bible”

In my last post, I made reference to CS Lewis’s comment that Matthew 24:34 — “Truly, I say to you, this generation will not pass away until all these things take place” — “the most embarrassing verse in the entire Bible”. In the comment section, Bruce from New Hampshire asks where Lewis made this statement. The answer is in an essay called, “The World’s Last Night,” and here is the quote in full: “‘Say what you like,’ we shall be […]

The Man of Lawlessness? The Son of Perdition? You Mean the Guy Jesus Dealt With 2,000 Years Ago?

Although I love writing about what the Bible teaches (or at least what I think it teaches), I know that whenever I do it will inevitably raise more questions than it answers, and that I’ll then have to spend time answering those questions, which in turn will lead to more questions, which will need more answers. And you know, there just aren’t enough hours in the day. But I’m a sucker for punishment, so here goes 🙂 Once again, I’m […]

Christ the Firstfruits, Then at His Coming Those who Belong to Christ.

One of my regular commenters, Phil, posted the following point in response to my previous article, Hey Pessimistic Christian, Cheer up. Christ Will Have Dominion. Because my answer is necessarily detailed, I thought I’d post it here. Here is Phil’s question: “Regarding the fact that the Lord Jesus will sit at God’s right hand *until* God makes all his enemies his footstool, your conclusion assumes that sitting at God’s right hand refers to the time between Jesus’ ascension and 2nd […]

Hey Pessimistic Christian, Cheer up! Christ Will Have Dominion!

Most Christians today have a very pessimistic outlook on the future of Christendom, not to mention the future of the world. They are not so much Amillennialists, or Premillennialists, but more Pessimillennialists — hamstrung with a pessimistic eschatology which comes mainly from what they see happening all around them. A failing church. Christianity being trampled underfoot and cast out. Doesn’t it signify the end times and Jesus’s coming soon to put an end to it all? Then there are those of […]

Epicurus Trolls God’s Ability and Willingness to Deal With Evil; God Enters His Creation to Answer the Charge

My piece on Epicurus’s famous riddle last week garnered a number of comments. One of those was from one of my regular commenters, GV, who asked the question, “Is there any other religion that gives a solution to his riddle?” I got the impression the question was probably rhetorical, yet it’s a good question and deserving of some thought. The basic gist of what I wrote in that piece is this. Undergirding Epicurus’s riddle are two major presuppositions, both of […]

Is Epicurus Neither Able nor Willing to Understand Evil and the Mercy of God? Then Why Give Him the Time of Day?

Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able? Then he is not omnipotent. Is he able, but not willing? Then he is malevolent. Is he both able and willing? Then whence cometh evil? Is he neither able nor willing? Then why call him God? Thus spake Epicurus, the Greek philosopher who lived from 341-270 BC. The riddle is undoubtedly a clever one, and yet it turns out to be loaded with a couple of erroneous presuppositions: firstly, a flawed […]

And all the Church Cried out to God?

I write this piece under the assumption that it will be read by those who are in some measure distressed by the current state of the culture in which they live. In many ways our situation is unique. Has there ever been a time when people thought that a marriage didn’t necessarily need a man or a woman? Of that it was okay to kill babies by the million under the banner of choice? Or when a man could just […]

Rebekah Brings Blind, Backslidden Isaac to Repentance

I had some good comments on my piece about Esau the other day, and once again I thought it would be helpful to post one of my responses which was fairly lengthy, but which is worth an airing here as it will probably prove to be quite surprising, and more than a little thought-provoking to anyone interested in such things.   So here’s a summary of the questions, which were once again posted by Phil:   When Esau sold his […]

Esau’s Repentance? Ain’t Worth a Mess of Pottage!

One of my regular readers, Phil, posted a comment at the bottom of a recent piece, with some great questions on the nature of repentance and God’s judicial hardening. I promised I would try to answer these questions as best I could, but since my response has turned out to be really rather long, rather than posting it on the comment section of that piece, where no-one except Phil will read it, I though I’d post it as a separate […]

You Know What You Remind me of Man? A Beautiful Painting Daubed in Graffiti and in Need of a Work of Restoration

I recently engaged with someone on a comment thread under one of my articles for The Conservative Woman, on a point which is — in my experience — a very common response to Christianity. The commenter said that Christians seem to claim a monopoly on doing good deeds, and he then went on to mention that although he is not religious, he both believes in doing good and actually does it. Since this is such a common response to Christianity, […]