Epicurus Trolls God’s Ability and Willingness to Deal With Evil; God Enters His Creation to Answer the Charge

My piece on Epicurus’s famous riddle last week garnered a number of comments. One of those was from one of my regular commenters, GV, who asked the question, “Is there any other religion that gives a solution to his riddle?” I got the impression the question was probably rhetorical, yet it’s a good question and deserving of some thought. The basic gist of what I wrote in that piece is this. Undergirding Epicurus’s riddle are two major presuppositions, both of […]

Is Epicurus Neither Able nor Willing to Understand Evil and the Mercy of God? Then Why Give Him the Time of Day?

Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able? Then he is not omnipotent. Is he able, but not willing? Then he is malevolent. Is he both able and willing? Then whence cometh evil? Is he neither able nor willing? Then why call him God? Thus spake Epicurus, the Greek philosopher who lived from 341-270 BC. The riddle is undoubtedly a clever one, and yet it turns out to be loaded with a couple of erroneous presuppositions: firstly, a flawed […]

Answering Archbishop Justin Welby’s Doubts: Part 2

This is the second part of my piece answering the Archbishop of Canterbury’s response to the Paris atrocities. The first part can be found here. Walking down the road which says “There is no God” doesn’t actually answer any of our questions (see Part 1). In fact, it throws up more intractable problems for us. Yet those questions still remain – “How does a God whom Christians claim is both good and omnipotent God appear to be utterly impotent or […]